The Monarchist 1.0
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[+] HONOURING OUR PATRON, SIR WINSTON CHURCHILL, VICTOR OF THE ENGLISH-SPEAKING PEOPLES

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[+] HONOURING OUR KING, SAINT EDWARD THE CONFESSOR, ON THE 1000TH YEAR OF HIS BIRTH (1005 - 2005)

[+] HONOURING OUR HERO, LORD NELSON, ON THE BICENTENNIAL OF THE BATTLE OF TRAFALGAR (1805 - 2005)

[+] HONOURING OUR SONS, THE QUEEN'S COMMONWEALTH SOLDIERS KILLED IN THE 'WAR ON TERROR'

[+] HONOURING OUR VETS ON THE 150TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE VICTORIA CROSS (1856 - 2006)

Tuesday, September 06, 2005
Nelson needs no introduction

Though I need not introduce myself to my esteemed and new found colleagues at the Monarchist, let me proudly state that I am on this day, September 6, 1805, the Right Honourable Lord Viscount Horatio Nelson, Vice Admiral of the White and Command-in-Chief of the Mediterranean Fleet, Hero of the Nile, and of the naval engagements at Copenhagen and Cape St. Vincent, Knight of the Most Honourable Order of the Bath, Baron of Burnham Thorpe in the County of Norfolk and Duke of Bronte in the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies….

Of my particular distinctions, I am most pleased by that last one given to me by the King of Naples, though I am ever mindful of British orders of precedence, that foreign titles, no matter how grand and imperious, must follow even the most inconsequential of English honours. But let me tell you I am also very mindful of the paucity of being awarded a mere Barony, for the heroic feat of destroying the French at the Battle of the Nile at Abukir Bay back in 98, strategically cutting Napoleon and his armies off from British interests in India. And all because of a technicality that I wasn’t the overall fleet commander of British forces in the area.

I do not profess my bitterness out of vainglory or arrogance. I am proclaimed the greatest naval commander of all time, immensely skillful in the science of seamanship, almost boundless in personal initiative and audacity and a brilliant tactician to boot. Perhaps. But let me tell you, now that I have been dead for almost 200 years, that Cook and Bligh were more weathered navigators and seamen; that the “Sea Wolf”, Admiral Thomas Cochrane, the Earl of Dundonald was far more audacious than I would ever care to be, having forcibly boarded a Spanish frigate and demanded its surrender with his comparatively tiny, totally out-gunned and totally out-manned brig; and that Admiral Spruance of the United States Navy was an even greater tactician, having faced a greater danger at Midway with his smaller US Task Force, yet having sunk all four Japanese carriers in the process. By the by, I fully support the intended actions of Senator Lugar of Indiana to sponsor before Congress, a bill that posthumously awards Admiral Spruance a fifth star. In the history of naval warfare, only Admiral Spruance would I consider to be every bit my equal.

But if I may be so bold, let me say that no naval commander has been able to inspire his men like I have, from the lowliest seaman to the highest admiral; no commander has been as gifted with the “Nelson touch”. No naval commander has been able to inspire a nation to such a feverish, Christ-like pitch. Some say I am the greatest field-commander of all time. Personally, I don’t agree. Wellington, my contemporary, and Marlborough, our hitherto hero, are, for example, two very qualified Englishmen who might challenge such an assertion. And Napoleon, Napoleon!, nothing concentrates the mind and boils the blood of sailors more than that Corsican Frenchman!

As I was saying. Today is September 6th and I’m presently with Lady Hamilton at leave in the countryside at my estate in Merton. It is so distressing to find England gripped with such fear of a Napoleon Armada. I know I shall be called upon soon to defend my country in the service of His Majesty The King. A great battle is looming. I can feel it. Pitt is in charge again. Melville is first Lord of the Admiralty. My dear Collingwood leads the Mediterranean fleet in my absence. Thomas Masterman Hardy is presently my good Captain of HMS Victory. Our Band of Brothers await. It shan’t be long now.

Nelson & Bronte

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