The Monarchist 1.0
Defending the British Crown Commonwealth and the English-Speaking Peoples
English Flag (1272) Scottish Flag (1286) King's Flag (1606) Budge Flag (1707) Grand Union Flag (1776) United States of America Flag (14 June 1777) United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (1801) UK Red Ensign UK White Ensign (1864) UK Blue Ensign Australian Flag (1901) New Zealand Flag (1917) Canadian National Flag (1965)

[+] HONOURING OUR PATRON, SIR WINSTON CHURCHILL, VICTOR OF THE ENGLISH-SPEAKING PEOPLES

[+] HONOURING OUR QUEEN, ELIZABETH THE SECOND, ON THE 80TH YEAR OF HER BIRTH (1926 - 2006)

[+] HONOURING OUR KING, SAINT EDWARD THE CONFESSOR, ON THE 1000TH YEAR OF HIS BIRTH (1005 - 2005)

[+] HONOURING OUR HERO, LORD NELSON, ON THE BICENTENNIAL OF THE BATTLE OF TRAFALGAR (1805 - 2005)

[+] HONOURING OUR SONS, THE QUEEN'S COMMONWEALTH SOLDIERS KILLED IN THE 'WAR ON TERROR'

[+] HONOURING OUR VETS ON THE 150TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE VICTORIA CROSS (1856 - 2006)

Wednesday, September 14, 2005
Nelson's last walk

LEAD-UP TO THE BATTLE OF TRAFALGAR
On this day, 200 years ago:

Early in the morning of Saturday 14th. September, 1805, at about 6.00am, the post chaise [horse-drawn carriage] carrying Vice Admiral Lord Nelson passed through the great Landport Gate on the north side of the complex fortifications ringing the naval town of Portsmouth. Swinging sharply to the left, along the foot of the ramparts to the huge tree-fringed Townmount Bastion, it then turned right into the High Street. There, it drew up in front of the bow windows of The George Hotel and deposited its weary passenger, who had been on the road since 10.30 the previous evening.

But there was little time for resting. After a quick breakfast, Nelson was on the move again: this time to the Dockyard to pay a courtesy call on Commissioner Saxton and then back to The George before noon, where he was joined by two members of the Government who had come to wish him God-speed, George Rose, the President of the Board of Trade and George Canning, the Treasurer of the Navy.

By now, news of his arrival had spread and a large crowd had gathered in the narrow streets outside the hotel. The usual point of embarkation for officers was at the Sally Port, just a few hundred yards away, at the seaward end of the High Street. But the crowd was so dense that a passage through would be difficult and so it was decided to take an alternative route. Leaving the Hotel by a back door, Nelson then endeavoured to elude the populace by taking a by-way to the beach; but a crowd collected in his train, pressing forward to obtain a sight of his face: many were in tears, and many knelt down before him and blessed him as he passed. England has had many heroes; but never one who so entirely possessed the love of his fellow-countrymen as Nelson. All men knew that his heart was as humane as it was fearless; that there was not in his nature the slightest alloy of selfishness or cupidity; but that with perfect and entire devotion he served his country with all his heart, and with all his soul, and with all his strength; and, therefore, they loved him as truly and as fervently as he loved England.

They pressed upon the parapet to gaze after him when his barge pushed off, and he was returning their cheers by waving his hat. The sentinels, who endeavoured to prevent them from trespassing upon this ground, were wedged among the crowd; and an officer who, not very prudently upon such an occasion, ordered them to drive the people down with their bayonets, was compelled speedily to retreat; for the people would not be debarred from gazing till the last moment upon the hero--the darling hero of England!

A long hard row away was the Victory. From the jostling crowd came the cheers ringing across the water, as Nelson waved his hat in reply and, turning to Hardy, said quietly:

'I had their huzzas before - I have their hearts now!'

Comments:

Can't see the comments?If you are unable to see the comments, your browser may have javascript turned off or may not support javascript. Check your security settings. Otherwise you can click here to access to comments in regular HTML from the TheirSay! Comment Server.
Elizabeth the Great

The Royal Arms of Canada, 1921

email: themonarchist@rogers.com

[+] LOYAL PROCLAMATION Queen's Personal Flag

[+] THE TORY MANIFESTO Tory Blue

[+] THE WHIGGISH RABBLE Liberal Red

[+] DEFENDERS OF THE REALMS (*)


DEFENDER OF THE FAITH Jerusalem Cross

[+] GOD SAVE THE QUEEN Royal Standard

[+] CHURCH OF ENGLAND England

[+] PATRON SAINTS

[+] THRONE AND ALTAR


KING AND COUNTRY Royal Arms of UK Royal Arms of Canada Royal Arms of Australia Royal Arms of New Zealand

[+] SOVEREIGN OF STATE

[+] FOUNT OF JUSTICE (*)

[+] QUEEN-IN-PARLIAMENT (*)

[+] COMMANDER-IN-CHIEF UK Joint Services Flag

[+] COLONEL-IN-CHIEF British Army Flag

[+] HER MAJESTY'S SHIPS Naval Ensign

[+] FOUNTAIN OF HONOUR Most Noble Order of the Garter

[+] PATRON OF THE ARTS

[+] HEAD OF COMMONWEALTH Queen's Personal Flag


LORD OF THE BLOG

[+] BLOG PATRON

[+] GENTLEMEN SCRIBES

[+] DISTINGUISHED GUESTS

[+] HEREDITARY PEERS British Union Jack

[+] BLOGGING TORIES Canada

[+] RED ENSIGN BRIGADE Red Ensign

[+] KIWI BLOGS Red Ensign

[+] WITANAGEMOT CLUB England

[+] ROYAL ARCHIVES Royal Standard